Sfairadora

  • Reference Guide

Ungrouping a Nested Table

If a table has a nested table in a column, the subordinate table can be dissolved by ungrouping so that all rows of the subordinate table become rows of the parent table. This is best illustrated by the following example:
Source table:
Product
Orders
Name
Delivery
Mixer
Adam Smith
1 Feb 2007
Barbara Cooper
5 Mar 2007
Carol Taylor
20 Feb 2007
Kitchen scale
Barbara Cooper
17 Feb 2007
Elizabeth Wright
2 Mar 2007
Carol Taylor
10 Feb 2007
Ungrouping the orders column:
Product
Name
Delivery
Mixer
Adam Smith
1 Feb 2007
Mixer
Barbara Cooper
5 Mar 2007
Mixer
Carol Taylor
20 Feb 2007
Kitchen scale
Barbara Cooper
17 Feb 2007
Kitchen scale
Elizabeth Wright
2 Mar 2007
Kitchen scale
Carol Taylor
10 Feb 2007
Ungrouping is performed by selecting the Ungroup Sequence command from the context menu of the column that contains the subordinate table. The context menu is invoked by right-clicking the column header (Orders in this example).
If a row of the subordinate table is empty, the ungrouping leaves out the entire row.
Ungrouping can be canceled by the inverse group operation.

Inserting Rows

If you insert a row into a view with an ungrouped table of rows and the value of the columns in the original outer table already exists, the row is added to the respective group. Therefore, if you insert, in the above example, the row {“Kitchen scale”, “Richard Wood”, 5 May 2007} into the ungrouped table, the new row inserted into the “Kitchen scale” product group in the source table is {“Richard Wood”, 5 May 2007}. If the new outer value does not yet exist in the data table, it is created and also the first row with the respective value is created in the group.
Warning: if you change the product value in a row in the ungrouped table, for example from “Kitchen scale” to “Mixer”, the respective row of the data table does not move from one group to another, but the value in the Product column changes from “Kitchen scale” to “Mixer” so that the table has two groups with the “Mixer” value. This is probably not the desired behavior. This behavior is the result of the fact that the Product column of the ungrouped table is realized by a forwarded item linked to the source table column of the same name, and therefore any change of this item is directly reflected in the change of the source table value.

Example – Grouping by Another Column

The resulting ungrouped table can be grouped by another column. If we, for example, group the table from the above example by the Name column, we will get a table of customers with their respective products:
Name
Group
Product
Delivery
Adam Smith
Mixer
1 Feb 2007
Barbara Cooper
Mixer
5 Mar 2007
Kitchen scale
17 Feb 2007
Carol Taylor
Mixer
20 Feb 2007
Kitchen scale
10 Feb 2007
Elizabeth Wright
Kitchen scale
2 Mar 2007